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New Study: Cannabis May Protect the Brain Against Stress and Stress-Related Disorders

posted Jul 30, 2013 15:31:54 by Consfearacynewz

A new study published in this month’s issue of the journal Neuropsychopharmacology has found that compounds in cannabis may offer protection against chronic stress,weedleaf.1 including the memory and learning impairment that can come as a result.

“Our findings suggest that cannabinoid receptor activation could represent a novel approach to the treatment of cognitive deficits that accompany a variety of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders”, concludes the study.

This is particularly important according to researchers, considering that repeated stress “is one of the environmental factors that precipitates and exacerbates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety as well as cognitive impairments”.

During the study, researchers found that daily doses of a chemical meant to mimic THC (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol) – one of the primary compounds found in cannabis – appeared to improve short-term memory in rats (which had been put through tests meant to induce stress) compared to the control group which didn’t receive any treatment. In addition, the rats which received the regular doses of THC displayed greater learning abilities, and less anxiety.

Repeated stress is one of the environmental factors that precipitates and exacerbates mental illnesses like depression and anxiety as well as cognitive impairments. We have previously shown that cannabinoids can prevent the effects of acute stress on learning and memory. Here we aimed to find whether chronic cannabinoid treatment would alleviate the long-term effects of exposure to chronic restraint stress on memory and plasticity as well as on behavioral and neuroendocrine measures of anxiety and depression. Late adolescent rats were exposed to chronic restraint stress for 2 weeks followed each day by systemic treatment with vehicle or with the CB1/2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1.2 mg/kg). Thirty days after the last exposure to stress, rats demonstrated impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) in the ventral subiculum-nucleus accumbens (NAc) pathway, impaired performance in the prefrontal cortex (PFC)-dependent object-recognition task and the hippocampal-dependent spatial version of this task, increased anxiety levels, and significantly reduced expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the amygdala, hippocampus, PFC, and NAc. Chronic WIN55,212-2 administration prevented the stress-induced impairment in LTP levels and in the spatial task, with no effect on stress-induced alterations in unconditioned anxiety levels or GR levels. The CB1 antagonist AM251 (0.3 mg/kg) prevented the ameliorating effects of WIN55,212-2 on LTP and short-term memory. Hence, the beneficial effects of WIN55,212-2 on memory and plasticity are mediated by CB1 receptors and are not mediated by alterations in GR levels in the brain areas tested. Our findings suggest that cannabinoid receptor activation could represent a novel approach to the treatment of cognitive deficits that accompany a variety of stress-related neuropsychiatric disorders.

Although more research is needed to confirm these findings, the results are promising. The study can be found by clicking here.
http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v38/n8/full/npp201351a.html
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